Guidance (FAQ)

Guidance (FAQ)

It is always difficult to know what to do first when dealing with the death of someone close to you. It’s not easy, but we will guide you through it every step of the way. G. L. Skinner & Son will provide you with a funeral service that will offer you the guidance you need at each stage of the arranging process, in an open, empathetic and considerate manner.

We can take care of almost everything about the funeral for you. However, there are some formalities you will need to go through before the funeral.

What you need to do depends on where your loved one has died, and whether their death was expected or unexpected.

 

What to do if death occurs at home

Firstly, A doctor will need to come to the house to certify that the person has passed.

This will be the person’s registered GP or sometimes it may be the on-call doctor.

When you are ready, you can call us and we’ll collect your loved one and bring them into our care. If the death was expected, the GP will provide a medical certificate showing the cause of death, which you will need to register the death.

 

What to do if a death is sudden or unexpected

When a sudden or unexpected death occurs the Coroner has to be informed. This can be as a result of an accident or trauma or, more usually, simply because the deceased person had not seen their doctor within the last 14 days. The Coroner’s duty is to establish the medical cause of death when, for whatever reason, a Doctor is unable to certify.
This may take some time so it’s a good idea to speak to us so we can liaise with the coroner and make provisional arrangements. Relatives will also be kept informed of the situation by the Coroner’s Officer and, in due course, notification issued by the Coroner will be sent to the Registrar.

 

What to do if death occurs in a Nursing Home or Residential Care Home

If a death occurs in a Nursing Home or Residential Care Home the care staff will contact the Doctor who may then call to establish that a death has taken place.

The Nursing Home should then contact the nearest relative or Executor to advise them of the death and to ask which Funeral Director should be contacted. No matter where death occurs it is the family’s choice as to which Funeral Director they instruct.

You should arrange to collect valuables, clothing and any other items from the Home. If the deceased was wearing any jewellery, find out whether it has been removed. The Home will advise you if the Doctor has left the death certificate there or it may need to be collected from their GP.

If the Doctor is unable to issue the death certificate he will contact the Coroner.

 

What to do if death occurs in a hospital or Hospice

If the person has died in hospital or hospice, you’ll liaise with the bereavement team who will offer practical and emotional support. The person who has died will usually be kept in the mortuary at the hospital or hospice until a funeral director is appointed or alternative arrangements are made. If you appoint us as your funeral director, we’ll be able to call the hospital or hospice and make the necessary arrangements.

The Hospital will advise the nearest relative or Executor of the death. They will tell you when you may call for the death certificate and collect any valuables, clothing and any other items.

If the deceased was wearing any jewellery, find out whether it has been removed. You will be asked to sign for these items. The deceased will be taken by the Hospital staff to the Hospital Mortuary.

Sometimes relatives or friends ask to see the deceased in the Mortuary Chapel. This can usually be arranged.

You normally need to register a person’s death within five working days.

Once you have done so, you will be given a death certificate, a Certificate for Burial or Cremation (called the ‘green form’) for the funeral director and form BD8 relating to the DSS and state pension. You may wish to purchase extra copies of the death certificate to satisfy bank, insurance and pension requirements. Different time limits apply in the case of stillbirth. Registration may also be delayed if the death is referred to the coroner.

 

Registration

You normally need to register a person’s death within five working days.

Once you have done so, you will be given a death certificate, a Certificate for Burial or Cremation (called the ‘green form’) for the funeral director and form BD8 relating to the DSS and state pension. You may wish to purchase extra copies of the death certificate to satisfy bank, insurance and pension requirements. Different time limits apply in the case of stillbirth. Registration may also be delayed if the death is referred to the coroner.

Who Can Register?
  • A close family member or any relative
  • Someone present at the death
  • An occupant of the house/official from the hospital
  • The person making the arrangements with the funeral directors
Documents and Information You Will Need
  • Medical certificate of the cause of death (signed by a doctor)

And if available:

  • Birth certificate
  • Marriage / civil partnership certificates
  • NHS Medical Card
Information

You will need to tell the registrar:

  • The person’s full name at time of death
  • Any names previously used, including maiden surname
  • The person’s date and place of birth (town and county if born in the UK and country if born abroad)
  • Their last address
  • Their occupation
  • The full name, date of birth and occupation of a surviving spouse or civil partner
  • Whether they were receiving a state pension or any other state benefit

 

Where to Register

To avoid delays, it is best to go to the registrar’s office in the area in which the death occurred. You can choose another register office, but it may take longer to get the necessary documents and this could delay the funeral arrangements.

A list of local registrars can be found HERE